Getting too close to a "cotton ball" cloud

abelenky
  • Getting too close to a "cotton ball" cloud abelenky

    When flying VFR, pilots are to stay free of clouds, which includes a minimum of 3 miles visibility, and 2,000 feet laterally.

    Yet, I've seen some youtube videos where it appears the pilot gets too close to a "cotton ball" (a small, isolated cloud) simply because it is along his flight path.

    If it is a very small, very isolated cloud, and you can see all the way around it, and have had good visibility on it for awhile as you approach, you know its not a "threat", right?

    I suppose the FAA could violate you if you approach a cotton ball, but other than that, is there any reason to deviate and go slaloming around the sky just to keep distance from FEW clouds?

  • I suppose the FAA could violate you if you approach a cotton ball, but other than that, is there any reason to deviate and go slaloming around the sky just to keep distance from FEW clouds?

    Aside from the legal reasons, keeping a healthy distance away from clouds is a Good Thing because other aircraft, birds, or alien spacecraft may pop out of them. Mid-Air collisions are no fun for anyone.

    As far as going "slaloming around the sky", there's generally no reason to do that to avoid clouds:
    If you're respecting the cloud clearance requirements (or at least the intent behind them) you shouldn't be getting close enough to clouds that you have to aggressively maneuver to avoid them - you've got plenty of distance to decide what you want to do.

    Remember too that you've got 3 dimensions to work with: If we're only talking about a "puffy cotton-ball" or two you can always climb above or descend below them and stay on-course, or if they're all lined up inconveniently right along your flight path just offset your track a little bit (no reason to keep zig-zagging if a mile left or right of course keeps you clear).

  • The rules are there for a reason, and yet they are broken regularly. Here in Europe, on a nice day for cross-country glider flying, every pilot climbs up until he/she almost touches the cloud. Thermals go up into big cumulus clouds (your puffy little ones are baby cumulus - just wait, and some of them will become really big), and the center is normally higher than the fringes (the updraft is below the center and continues into the cloud, the fringes show downdraft - the rising air has to come down somewhere).

    Updrafts get stronger the higher they are, so the last meters below the cloud give you the best energy increase, and the pilots use the last circle not for climbing, but for speeding up. Then they fly straight out from the thermal, through the puffy fringes and out into the open sky at high speed (for a glider, that is).

    It just happens. A friend once told me that he was below a cloud, and right next to him a turboprop airliner descended from the cloud. However, that must have been a bad airliner pilot, because flying through a cumulus like this incurs a lot of avoidable turbulence.

Related questions and answers
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