VOR orientation near magnetic pole

falstro
  • VOR orientation near magnetic pole falstro

    I noticed on SkyVector that, for example, the Resolute Bay VOR (YRB) and Baker Lake VOR (YBK) seem to be oriented in such a way that the 360 radial is pointing in the direction of true north (and I don't think the variation is anywhere near zero there).

    I know VORs are supposed to be oriented according to magnetic north, but is it common practice close to the magnetic poles to have them point true instead? If so, is there any way to tell if a particular VOR is doing just that, except looking at the chart and noticing that the small arrow is pointing north rather than off to one side?

  • VOR stations in areas of magnetic compass unreliability are oriented with respect to True North

    From Wikipedia

    I don't think you can tell if it's pointing true north by looking at the charts. However, it doesn't really matter anyway because your own compass would be unreliable as well when flying in the vicinity of such a VOR. After all, when navigating using a VOR, you don't fly a heading, you fly a radial.

  • In areas of large magnetic declination, approaches and runways are given in true instead of magnetic headings, designated by T after the heading, such as RNAV 13T approach. If you are assigned a VOR radial, just follow that radial whether it is true or magnetic.

    The important thing is that you don't use magnetic headings on a true approach. Look out for that capital T up north.

  • Canadian Northern Domestic Airspace (NDA) is the area of compass unreliability within which runways and NAVAIDs are oriented to true or grid north versus magnetic north.

    You should not need to worry about which NAVAID is to true north; simply keep track of whether you're in Southern or Northern Domestic Airspace.

Related questions and answers
  • I noticed on SkyVector that, for example, the Resolute Bay VOR (YRB) and Baker Lake VOR (YBK) seem to be oriented in such a way that the 360 radial is pointing in the direction of true north (and I don't think the variation is anywhere near zero there). I know VORs are supposed to be oriented according to magnetic north, but is it common practice close to the magnetic poles to have them point true instead? If so, is there any way to tell if a particular VOR is doing just that, except looking at the chart and noticing that the small arrow is pointing north rather than off to one side?

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