Pilot endorsement requirements for amphibians

Qantas 94 Heavy
  • Pilot endorsement requirements for amphibians Qantas 94 Heavy

    I know that for land aircraft and seaplanes that they require separate endorsements to fly them. However, for the case of amphibians, what do you need to fly one? Do you need to have another, completely different endorsement, or just a seaplane and land endorsements? What about if you always fly it on water or land?

  • According to seaplanes.org you can operate an amphibious airplane on hard-surface runways with a land class rating but need a seaplane class rating to take off or land on water, and vice versa.

    As far as the regs, it seems that the airplane can simply be considered either land or seaplane class depending on how you are operating it.

Related questions and answers
  • I know that for land aircraft and seaplanes that they require separate endorsements to fly them. However, for the case of amphibians, what do you need to fly one? Do you need to have another, completely different endorsement, or just a seaplane and land endorsements? What about if you always fly it on water or land?

  • ). The takeoffs and landings at (airport name) are subject to the following conditions: (List any applicable conditions or limitations.) Emphasis on the word TO, in (1). I interpret this as "You must be endorsed to fly solo TO another airport for takeoffs and landings." However, my instructor, and it would seem the majority of the instructors at my school interpret it as "You must be endorsed to fly solo.... However, the instructor is required to fly dual up there, solo the student, and fly dual back. Is this endorsement required in that case?

  • might not get to use the machine again, and you might spend some time in hospital, you would live to fly another day. I am assuming a reasonable place on dry land is available to finally come to rest...When I learned to fly helicopters, I of course spent significant time learning about and practicing autorotations. The CFI at my school, who had around 15,000 hrs (that's right, fifteen thousand!) said a few times that practice, knowledge and currency are vital — but as long as you got the entry right (following which you can fly to the ground) and executed at least a decent attempt

  • I have heard conflicting information regarding pre-clearing customs in the USVI. On one hand, I have heard that once you clear customs you are done and don't need to do anything special on arrival. But the I've also heard that you need to land at an Airport of Entry upon arrival and notify local customs of your arrival. I have even called Customs and Border Protection and gotten conflicting answers! What is actually required?

  • I have some questions about circle-to-land approaches. If we have the runway in sight above MDA, do we need to continue to descend to MDA on downwind? Can we just keep fly like a traffic pattern until abeam aiming point and then start the descent? Similarly, If during circle to land approach we lose the runway on downwind but we are above MDA, do we need go missed still toward to the runway? Since we are above MDA we should still have obstacle clearance....

  • ) Category D: Speed 141 knots or more but less than 166 knots. (5) Category E: Speed 166 knots or more. So an aircraft category never changes because it is always Vref at max landing weight. What if I fly an approach at a speed that falls into a different category? For instance, a jet may land at significantly less than this speed if very light, or more than this speed if landing with less than full flaps due to a failure (or any other operational reason). Which minimums do you use then?

  • I'm from Brazil, and here we use the West/East rule, so we use an odd flight level when we fly between 0/360 - 179, and when we fly between 180 - 359 we fly in an even flight level. But what should you do in other countries? Where I can find those rules? I've heard that in Europe it's totally different, and that in some countries in Asia they use meters, instead of feet. Where can I find this information?

  • plane was fine, and I can't find any Part 61 regulations that are specific to experience in one make/model aside from adding an experimental aircraft as part §61.63(h)(1), which is what I assume... club's 1980 Piper Archer (PA-28-181). I have well over §61.109's 40 hours in the Warrior alone, and only ~10 hours in the Archer. I have a separate club checkout and CFI solo endorsement for each... would encounter if I need to change the tail number or model number of my checkride plane and listed hours therein, potentially long after IACRA submission?

  • I know it might seem like a silly basic question, clearly some of these aircraft are awfully complex. I doubt anyone questions the idea of a type rating for a 747-400. But where is the line between, "sure, if you can fly you can probably fly this one" and, "you need to know how to fly this plane in particular". What sorts of functionality cause that sort of distinction?

  • as well land. But what about in a light, single engine plane (think Cessna 172 or Piper Cherokee)? Engine failures in small aircraft, for example, seem to be more common, so you have more... at an altitude where you don't need oxygen to bail out. With that in mind, couldn't you put the plane into a shallow dive to keep it from stalling, trim it to keep it going straight and then bail out? It seems like a somewhat practical solution, yet I have never heard of anyone doing it. Why do pilots often try to find a road to land on or a lake to ditch in when trouble strikes instead

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