Aviation Programming Language

AgEnT x19
  • Aviation Programming Language AgEnT x19

    Generally speaking, What programming language is used in aviation for (ATC Radio, Radar, ILS, Auto-pilot and on-board avionics)?

    • Is there a standard enforced by ICAO?
    • Does every plane manufacturer use the programming language they like as long as it's reliable and it goes through testing?

    I remember watching a documentary on YouTube last year about aviation and it said something about the EU, after WWII, started making standards for aviation systems inside Europe. I will link the video if I can find it

  • As far as I know, there is no directive on which language to use. You have guidelines on how to test and certify software, but as far as these guidelines are concerned, no language is preferred, it is a design choice.

    As of today, in my (limited) experience as an engineer/programmer, I have mostly seen that non object oriented languages are preferred, since they reduce the amount of testing required. Usual arguments I have encountered primarily concern explicit memory management in often resource-limited environments.

Related questions and answers
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