Question about a missed approach procedure

camilogv
  • Question about a missed approach procedure camilogv

    I have a question regarding this Missed Approach Procedure

    Im in my final approach segment and reach DME 1.1 and the runway is not in sight so I start my Missed approach, how should it be executed?

    1. Since I have to hold I'd start a tear drop entry turning to heading 125° and then left turn intercepting 275° course inbound. This option sounds viable to me

    2. I first do a right 360° as charted (???) and going to the VOR and then starting probably a parallel entry into the hold. This doesn't sound viable to me

    Textual description is also clear about that 360° If it 1.) why would they chart that 360° there?

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  • The missed approach is a climbing right turn to the VOR and then hold while climbing to 3000 ft. The purpose of the 360 is probably to gain some altitude before entering the hold (someone with TERPS knowledge can address this). The MSA where the hold is is 2000' and you start the missed at 390'. The right turn will be protected starting at 390' wheras the hold is not, so you need to gain altitude before entering it. Part of the issue here is that you can fly any entry you want, so the protected airspace for a hold (which determines its minimum altitude) is a somewhat large area.

    To fly it:

    • Execute your missed approach items (flaps, gear, etc)
    • Enter a climbing right turn direct to RHC VOR.
    • Upon reaching RHC VOR continue to climb and fly the holding entry of your choice
    • Hold as published.

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