How can I see the revision history of a particular FAR?

Lnafziger
  • How can I see the revision history of a particular FAR? Lnafziger

    For instance, I don't remember paragraph 61.51(e)(iii) at all from way back when I studied it to determine when I could log PIC time. I'm fairly certain that it has been added since then (actually, there was no sport pilot license back then so I know that it has at least been changed), but I would like to know when it was changed and what the changes were.

    At the bottom of the reg, it includes this:

    [Doc. No. 25910, 62 FR 16298, Apr. 4, 1997; Amdt. 61-103, 62 FR 40897, July 30, 1997; Amdt. 61-104, 63 FR 20286, Apr. 23, 1998; Amdt. 61-110, 69 FR 44865, July 27, 2004; Amdt. 61-124, 74 FR 42549, Aug. 21, 2009; Amdt. 61-128, 76 FR 54105, Aug. 31, 2011]

    This tells me when it was amended, but not what was amended.

    Does the FAA make that information available?

  • You can find this information with a bit of digging.

    Hit up the GPO (Government Printing Office) here: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfrFR.action?collectionCode=CFRPARTS

    Choose the date range you want to look up.

    Then choose the Title of the CFR you want (Aviation stuff is Title 14 CFR), and drill down until you find the Part you want, and it will give you some meta data about the change, and then the actual text of the change.

    There might be an easier way, but, it is the federal government, so maybe not. :)

    To answer your specific question, here is the link: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/search/pagedetails.action?browsePath=&granuleId=2011-26229&packageId=FR-2011-10-12&fromBrowse=true (Click on the "Text" link for full details)

  • Changes to federal aviation regulations are listed on the FAA’s Regulatory & Guidance Library (RGL) at http://rgl.faa.gov/:

    • From the home page, click on the database titled "Code of Federal Regulations"
    • On the left, in the navigation tree, select one of the branches under "Historical CFR" (for example, "By Part")
    • On the right, expand the items leading to the regulation that you are looking for (in this case Part 61)
    • Scroll down to the regulation that you are looking for (61.51) and it will list the original version and all of the revisions:

    61.51 revision history

    Each revision is a link which takes you to the regulation as of that version, with links to the NPRM's and dockets so that you can see what has been changed!

Related questions and answers
  • For instance, I don't remember paragraph 61.51(e)(iii) at all from way back when I studied it to determine when I could log PIC time. I'm fairly certain that it has been added since then (actually, there was no sport pilot license back then so I know that it has at least been changed), but I would like to know when it was changed and what the changes were. At the bottom of the reg, it includes... FR 42549, Aug. 21, 2009; Amdt. 61-128, 76 FR 54105, Aug. 31, 2011] This tells me when it was amended, but not what was amended. Does the FAA make that information available?

  • If an autobrake setting is chosen prior to touchdown, but after touchdown and nosewheel compression (i.e. after the autobrake has engaged) a different setting is required, is it safe to change the setting during the roll-out? What happens when the setting is changed in this manner? I know application of manual brakes disables the autobrake. Does the autobrake immediately match the new deceleration requested?

  • I'm a student pursuing a US Private Pilot License, and recently scheduled my checkride. I've been training in a 1981 Piper Warrior (PA-28-161), but if its annual goes sour I may have to take my... specifically for [II.A.2.] Total time in this make/model and/or approved FFS or FTD (Hrs.) Furthermore, according to the IACRA FAQ ("I'm a Designated Examiner. I noticed a mistake when reviewing the IACRA application...."): A mistake in the applicant's information cannot be corrected after it has been signed by the Recommending Instructor. My prospective DPE explicitly told me that the backup

  • that they consider the training to have been completed in March. So what happens if a year passes and recurrent training is due. I don't make it in February or March, but the company schedules me for recurrent... months) but I haven't been to training yet, so 135.323 doesn't really apply. From my interpretation of the regulations I would say no, however every 135 company that I have ever flown..., as a crewmember in operations under this part unless that crewmember has completed the appropriate initial or recurrent training phase of the training program appropriate to the type of operation

  • I remember back in the 90's that commercial planes would line up on the runway, stop, apply full power and then release the brake to take off. Now I've been on flight where they've literally rolled from the taxiway straight onto the runway and then powered up without stopping. Why has that changed? What were the reasons for the older style?

  • I hope this is a relevant place for me to ask a math question regarding aircraft design. I am trying to understand how one would implement a controller to control the pitch angle of an airplane for a small exercise. I understand the control part and its implementation. What I do not grasp is how one acquires the longitudinal equations of motions (which are then used for the control part) which serves as the starting point. What is the starting point or what are the principles used to derive these equations? If I know how to derive these equations for a very simple case, then I know I have

  • heading. He didn't complain, but I'm still not sure if that's what he wanted. A bit later I got a similar call (callsign) request QNE However, I was unfamiliar with that Q-code (as a private pilot in Europe you pretty much need to know QNH, QFE, QDM and QTE) and only later found out it means "pressure altitude". Q-codes suck. Anyway I said "Say again" and he came back and asked how many were...I recently had the opportunity to fly a PAR approach into Büchel Airbase in Germany. It was a ton of fun and I'll definitely try it again when I get the chance. However, as we were getting set up

  • Part 135 and (I believe) Part 121 operations all have a requirement to use a source of weather that has been approved by the U.S. National Weather Service: §135.213 Weather reports and forecasts. (a) Whenever a person operating an aircraft under this part is required to use a weather report or forecast, that person shall use that of the U.S. National Weather Service, a source... a list of weather providers that have been approved and are legal for us to use? If not, then how do we know whether a particular source has been approved?

  • translate to a deflection of the surfaces, mimicking the "old" mechanical control setup. It is my understanding that this is the design choice of Boeing in its new aircrafts. I do not wish to discuss how Airbus and Boeing made their design decisions, but rather see if there has been performed a study on what interface is preferred by pilots, eventually differentiating among private/commercial pilots...Provided an aircraft with a fly-by-wire system, there are basically two possible choices when it comes deciding how to let the pilots interface with it: rate control / attitude hold: a deflection

  • What is the policy for ATC towers to notify aircraft the frequency they broadcast and monitor on has changed? How do they do it, if radio isn't available (because they just changed their frequency)?

Data information