Can I land a helicopter anywhere?

Canuk
  • Can I land a helicopter anywhere? Canuk

    If I own a helicopter and am appropriately rated, can I land the helicopter anywhere that isn't private property, and is a safe place to land (clear of obstructions, appropriate surface, etc.)?

    My question is specifically about the regulatory requirements to land a helicopter off-airport in the United States.

  • Per ยง91.119 of the FARs, yes. That said, you can't just find an open field-there may be local/state regulations regarding helicopter operations.

    14 CFR 91.119:

    (1) A helicopter may be operated at less than the minimums prescribed in paragraph (b) or (c) of this section, provided each person operating the helicopter complies with any routes or altitudes specifically prescribed for helicopters by the FAA

  • It all depends on the exact location. You need the Federal, State, Local, USFS, Zoning, etc... If you have a spot you'd like to land at, you need to start doing the research early and make sure you don't forget any agency or possible owner before you land. Just because the land owner says it's ok, doesn't mean you won't get into serious trouble with someone else.

Related questions and answers
  • If I own a helicopter and am appropriately rated, can I land the helicopter anywhere that isn't private property, and is a safe place to land (clear of obstructions, appropriate surface, etc.)? My question is specifically about the regulatory requirements to land a helicopter off-airport in the United States.

  • This question is somewhat related to this other one. I listened to this exchange between a helicopter and Newark. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHNvXPbZ7WI The helicopter wants to land at Newark. The controller tells the helicopter to remain clear of the Class B. I'm aware that the controllers must give clearance to operate in certain classes of airspace, and the helicopter wasn't granted clearance to do so. Why was the helicopter denied (as far as can be deduced)? What should the pilot have done differently, either to get clearance to land at Newark or to anticipate not being able to?

  • The MD-900 is a helicopter which seems to be quite popular with law enforcement agencies. As you can see, instead of an anti-torque tail rotor, a fan exhaust is directed out slots in the tail boom. I was wondering if this works in regards to auto rotation, should the aircraft lose its engines.

  • Quoting from page 162 of the book "Fatal traps for helicopter pilots" by Greg Whyte: Hydraulic jack stall (servo transparency) in (AS-350) helicopter is an aerodynamic phenomenon can occur when the helicopter is flown outside it is normal flight envelope and subjected to positive maneuvering (g-loading). It results in uncommanded aft and right cyclic and down-collective motion accompanied by pitch up and right roll of the helicopter. My question: What is reason for uncommanded aft and right cyclic collective down pitch up and right roll?

  • What are the rules with regards to landing a float plane on a body of water? Can I land anywhere (non-emergency, obviously) that would also accommodate the take-off? If not, how do I determine which bodies of water would allow it and which would not?

  • I was watching some police programme on TV the other day, with an air chase that had the police helicopter crew on their toes; having to perform a lot of sudden maneuvers. How do police, or HEMS (medical), helicopters communicate with ATC? I presume they get priority, but do ATC clear other traffic out of the way? Is there a comms person/navigator on-board? Do they simply "see and avoid"?

  • Let's say we have a Cessna 150 or some other lightweight two seater and no chance to land with head wind for whatever reason. We're trying to land with a constant tailwind of 7 knots. I would try to land as close to stall speed as possible to compensate the tailwind. So much for the theory. In reality, the wind is not constant. If I'm close to stall, dying wind will give me trouble. What's a general good approach for such situations? What configuration would you choose? If the runway is very long, one can just go faster. But often, runways are rather short.

  • I noticed on SkyVector that, for example, the Resolute Bay VOR (YRB) and Baker Lake VOR (YBK) seem to be oriented in such a way that the 360 radial is pointing in the direction of true north (and I don't think the variation is anywhere near zero there). I know VORs are supposed to be oriented according to magnetic north, but is it common practice close to the magnetic poles to have them point true instead? If so, is there any way to tell if a particular VOR is doing just that, except looking at the chart and noticing that the small arrow is pointing north rather than off to one side?

  • Aircraft can be brought into the US and be made airworthy by FAA standards. What about aircraft legally modified in other countries? For example, there is a new STC to put a Rotax 912 into Cessna 150s approved by the EASA. Can that STC be made legal in the US even though no similar STC exists here? If yes, is this just due to relations between the EASA and FAA, or can this be done with aircraft coming from anywhere?

  • I have some questions about circle-to-land approaches. If we have the runway in sight above MDA, do we need to continue to descend to MDA on downwind? Can we just keep fly like a traffic pattern until abeam aiming point and then start the descent? Similarly, If during circle to land approach we lose the runway on downwind but we are above MDA, do we need go missed still toward to the runway? Since we are above MDA we should still have obstacle clearance....

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