Why does the EGT gauge in 172s have no numbers on it?

Aaron
  • Why does the EGT gauge in 172s have no numbers on it? Aaron

    So the EGT gauge on the 172 (and other cessna singles?) doesn't have a numerical scale on it, just markings every 25 degrees. I know that one is supposed to use the EGT for leaning operations (ROP, LOP, what have you), but it's always stymied me that there are no actual numbers on it. Any reason why this is so?

  • The simple EGT gauges do not have numerical scales because you never lean to a temperature. You find the peak temperature, set the movable red needle to that temperature, and then lean to x degrees lean (or enrichen to x degrees) of peak temperature.

    Set the peak temperature at full throttle, full rich at a sea level airport.

    This system eliminates the concerns of calibration: Is the gauge calibrated, did the mechanic install the probe in exactly the right spot, etc. etc.

Related questions and answers
  • So the EGT gauge on the 172 (and other cessna singles?) doesn't have a numerical scale on it, just markings every 25 degrees. I know that one is supposed to use the EGT for leaning operations (ROP, LOP, what have you), but it's always stymied me that there are no actual numbers on it. Any reason why this is so?

  • Why is the first letter in US registration numbers 'N'? Other countries seem to use a letter significant to their country, for instance 'G' for Great Britain, 'F' for France, 'D' for Germany (presumably for Deutschland), and 'JA' for Japan. Does 'N' have any significance at all?

  • I realize that airlines can operate with different numbers of Pilots and Flight Attendants, depending on the route, aircraft and length of flight (EET). Which are the types of crew members that an airline can have, with the correct titles? I've heard about captains, master captains and cruise captains, but how can I identify them during the flights?

  • Why is it that black boxes don't float? From what I gather the answer is: So they will not float away from a water crash site. The ping can be heard underwater with sonar. Finding the ping, finds the site. But why not have two black boxes one that floats and one that stays with the aircraft? That way if a plane is lost at sea, if we find the black box floating, we could use the data to find the other black box and the crash site. Plus the benefits of having a redundancy are enormous.

  • As a private pilot I have zero knowledge about how big jets are being flown so I was a little surprised to see that smaller Airbuses (A32x) only use spoilers for roll control on final approach... when exiting the aircraft he was a little annoyed by the question and he said I must have seen it wrong. I've seen this numerous times since then so I'm pretty sure I wasn't mistaken. Is this actually how the spoilers are used on approach, and if so, why?

  • I've been told that the best kinds of planes to train in are very small ones, like Cessna 150s and 152s. But I've never been clear as to why. I know they are cheaper to operate, so is operation cost the only thing? Or are there aerodynamic properties that 152s have that make them "easier"? What makes for a good training aircraft?

  • Wikipedia provides some numbers (typical empty weight, MTOW, max fuel capacity, etc.), but I can't seem to find more detailed figures. For a purpose of this question, let's assume a fully loaded A380 in typical 3-class configuration (~530 passengers) and fuel for a long haul flight (>10h). So, what is the typical weight of the passengers + luggages? Is any additional cargo typically carried? If so how much? What about the weight of crew and catering? And fuel weight? (Fuel weight will depend on actual flight duration, so the answer should mention the corresponding flight duration.)

  • Why would ATC generally issue vectors instead of simply issuing speed reductions to aircraft? It'd seem more efficient to have aircraft flying less track miles, so is there any reason that speed control is worse than giving vectors to aircraft?

  • WWII. They didn't have flight control computers back then, and the only control complaints I recall them having is that early versions had a tendency to flip over backwards when approaching stall speeds, well, that and the ground effects were pretty strong. But, no mentions of going into flat spins when going into hard maneuvers (that I recall). So how do they control that Y axis on flying wings...How do flying wings, like the B-2 Stealth bomber, actually keep themselves from yawing out of control without a vertical stabilizer? For the record, I assume this has to be a simple mechanics

  • level of skill and education. Supply and demand is one explanation, but I really don't understand how there is so much competition for flying jobs but at the same time there is a supposed "pilot shortage". Are there really so many pilots out there that the competition for jobs drives down starting salaries so low? I am hoping to understand why it is that well-qualified pilots appear to have so... can't compete with pilots willing to work for $17k/yr. For comparison, federal minimum wage is currently just over $15K/yr. Why are the starting salaries at US Regional Airlines so low? It seems odd

Data information