What are the US Customs requirements upon returning to the US after pre-clearing customs in the US Virgin Islands?

Lnafziger
  • What are the US Customs requirements upon returning to the US after pre-clearing customs in the US Virgin Islands? Lnafziger

    I have heard conflicting information regarding pre-clearing customs in the USVI. On one hand, I have heard that once you clear customs you are done and don't need to do anything special on arrival. But the I've also heard that you need to land at an Airport of Entry upon arrival and notify local customs of your arrival. I have even called Customs and Border Protection and gotten conflicting answers! What is actually required?

  • You're required to notify and clear customs if you land in the 50 U.S. states or Puerto Rico from the U.S. Virgin Islands, even though the U.S. Virgin Islands is part of the U.S.

    "All private aircraft arriving in the United States via the Gulf of Mexico or the Atlantic Coast from a foreign location in the Western Hemisphere south of 30 degrees north latitude, or from any place in Mexico or from the U.S. Virgin Islands, shall also furnish a notice of intended arrival. Such aircraft must then land for inspection at the nearest designated airport unless an overflight exemption has been granted under Section 122.25 of the Customs Regulations."

Tags
Related questions and answers
  • I have heard conflicting information regarding pre-clearing customs in the USVI. On one hand, I have heard that once you clear customs you are done and don't need to do anything special on arrival. But the I've also heard that you need to land at an Airport of Entry upon arrival and notify local customs of your arrival. I have even called Customs and Border Protection and gotten conflicting answers! What is actually required?

  • It seems that you would use full power for takeoffs, but when I have heard of airline pilots using less than full power on takeooff. Wouldn't it be safer to use full throttle?

  • Let's say that we're directly west of CATLI and have been cleared direct CATLI for the RNAV approach. We load the approach into the GNS430 and proceed direct the fix. After crossing CATLI outbound for the hold-in-lieu-of-procedure-turn, we realize that we want to stay in the hold for a few more turns. How do I tell the 430 that I don't want it to sequence to ZAMGI upon arrival at CATLI?

  • protect the president whilst in the air? I have heard of TFRs for "VIP in the area" reasons — is that for AF1? I am guessing that the aircraft identification is blocked, but wouldn't they still need... jet was close to Air Force One and was unresponsive to calls. "As we got over Gainesville, Fla., we got the word from Jacksonville Center. They said, 'Air Force One you have traffic behind you and basically above you that is descending into you, we are not in contact with them – they have shut their responder off.' And at that time it kind of led us to believe maybe someone was coming into us

  • service only where the person holds an appropriate radio operator certificate [...] However, I can't find a regulation saying I need the piece of paper with me. An example of the wording Canada uses in its regulations to say that you need to actually have the document with you is at CARS 401.03 (1)(d) (regarding pilot licences): the person can produce the permit, licence or rating...Is there a Canadian law or regulation which requires me to have my Radiotelephone Operator's Restricted Certificate (Aeronautical) on-board the aircraft with me? This is what I've found so far

  • To most non-U.S. pilots who have little or no experience flying in the U.S., the concept of a FBO is not very well understood. What exactly is a FBO and what are the services that it can provide? I've heard that they can refuel your plane, move it to a hangar, clean it, provide preflight planning facilities, etc. Is there a charge for these services (I guess so) and if so, what can be expected... there's no such thing. If you need fuel you either taxi to the pump and fill up or call up the fuel provider (if you're lucky because they usually only serve private jets).

  • After answering this question on History.SE, I started to wonder if it would be possible to find out even more detail about the plane now that its serial number is known. I have no idea what kind of flight records the US Army Air Corps kept, however. I know most flight logs today are kept by pilot, but I imagine there would be some way to trace what pilots flew a particular plane. I have no idea if this is possible for USAAC trainer planes in the 1930s. Could I get access to these records? If so, how would I go about it? I'm mostly interested in seeing if I can find out more information

  • Non-precision instrument approaches generally have altitude restrictions which get lower when you get closer to the airport. I always figured these restrictions were AMSL using the current altimeter setting, not compensating for temperature. Some have heard the mnemonic that mountains are higher come wintertime, which basically means that colder weather make your altimeter read higher than you actually are (or, as most pilots prefer to think, you're lower than what your altimeter reads) Have a look at this VOR approach into Newark Most altitude restrictions are a minimum level, so

  • In the US, there's a TFR everywhere a designated VIP (US president or vice president) is going to be. When (most?) foreign VIPs visit the US, I don't think there are TFRs in place for them (unless the location coincides with our VIPs). Are there TFRs (or international equivilents) in other countries when the US VIPs are there?

  • I know that for land aircraft and seaplanes that they require separate endorsements to fly them. However, for the case of amphibians, what do you need to fly one? Do you need to have another, completely different endorsement, or just a seaplane and land endorsements? What about if you always fly it on water or land?

Data information