Are remarks in the Airport/Facility directory "regulatory" or "advisory"?

voretaq7
  • Are remarks in the Airport/Facility directory "regulatory" or "advisory"? voretaq7

    StallSpin's answer on the recent question about VFR traffic patterns has got me thinking about the "Remarks" section of the Airport/Facility Directory.

    We are all taught in training to review the AFD entry for airports we intend to visit (part of FAR 91.103's "become familiar with all available information" requirement), and to comply with any restrictions noted - typically things like "no touch-and-go landings", "Standard traffic pattern required of all aircraft", "Prior Permission Required for jet aircraft", etc.

    Aside from it being The Right Thing To Do, and avoiding the possibility of local fines/sanctions, are the remarks in the Airport/Facility Directory "regulatory" such as to require compliance, or are they advisory where compliance is encouraged but not mandatory?

  • A required rule in the airport/facility directory is required. It is a very good idea to check the AFD entry online (or on paper) before you fly to a new airport. It just takes a second and you can learn important things, such as "NO DEPS AFT 2230" or "PPR FOR TKOF ON RY 15. CTC FBO 970-920-2016" (Aspen).

Related questions and answers
  • StallSpin's answer on the recent question about VFR traffic patterns has got me thinking about the "Remarks" section of the Airport/Facility Directory. We are all taught in training to review the AFD entry for airports we intend to visit (part of FAR 91.103's "become familiar with all available information" requirement), and to comply with any restrictions noted - typically things like "no touch-and-go landings", "Standard traffic pattern required of all aircraft", "Prior Permission Required for jet aircraft", etc. Aside from it being The Right Thing To Do, and avoiding the possibility

  • holder's operations. Before that though, 14 CFR 135.323 states: §135.323 - Training program: General. ... (b) Whenever a crewmember who is required to take recurrent training under... it in the calendar month in which it was required. ... So let's say that I completed initial training in March. This says that if I complete recurrent training in February or April... training towards the end of April. Is it legal for me to fly in April before I go to recurrent training? At this point, I don't meet 135.343 (because I am no longer within the required 12 calendar

  • I'm a student pursuing a US Private Pilot License, and recently scheduled my checkride. I've been training in a 1981 Piper Warrior (PA-28-161), but if its annual goes sour I may have to take my club's 1980 Piper Archer (PA-28-181). I have well over §61.109's 40 hours in the Warrior alone, and only ~10 hours in the Archer. I have a separate club checkout and CFI solo endorsement for each... plane was fine, and I can't find any Part 61 regulations that are specific to experience in one make/model aside from adding an experimental aircraft as part §61.63(h)(1), which is what I assume

  • So when a pilot is flying along and suddenly hears a "Climb... Climb..." Resolution Advisory (RA) from ACAS/TCAS, we are trained to immediately climb to avoid a collision with another aircraft... or is there any guidance to say when the report is required? I.e. is it anytime that we get an RA (even if we visually have the aircraft in sight), only if we actually respond to an RA, or is it if the two... Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) office when: ... (10) Airborne Collision and Avoidance System (ACAS) resolution advisories issued either: (i) When an aircraft is being operated

  • Advisory Circular AC 61-136 which outlines the approval and limitations of flight training devices seems to contradict 14 CFR 61.57(c). To what extent can I use an AATD for instrument currency? In addition, to what extent can an AATD be used toward and instrument proficiency check (IPC)? Edit: I have located this document from the FAA Office of Aviation Safety that clarifies that AATDs and BATDs are governed by FAR 61.4(c) and are authorized for specific purposes and can be used in the same manner at a Flight Training Device instead of a Aviation Training Device as long as they have

  • FAR Part 91, Appendix G, Section 2 says: (c) Altitude-keeping equipment: All aircraft. To approve an aircraft group or a nongroup aircraft, the Administrator must find that the aircraft meets the following requirements: ... (2) The aircraft must be equipped with at least one automatic altitude control system that controls the aircraft altitude Note that it does not say that it must be engaged, or even operative. Simply "equipped", and also that this is to approve an aircraft for RVSM. From what I can find, there is no operational requirement for the autopilot

  • 14 CFR 61.55 says: ... (d) A person may receive a second-in-command pilot type rating for an aircraft after satisfactorily completing the second-in-command familiarization training requirements under paragraph (b) of this section in that type of aircraft provided the training was completed within the 12 calendar months before the month of application for the SIC pilot type... or to an Examiner with his or her logbook/training records and with the completed and signed FAA Form 8710-1. (7) There is no practical test required for the issuance of the “SIC Privileges Only

  • (National Air Traffic Controllers Association) which would prevent them from answering questions on this site? I realize this blurs the line slightly between the main site and meta, but I'm asking about legal reasons, not speculation about why we haven't attracted any controllers yet (that I'm aware of). ...While asking the question in chat How do we get controllers on the site? @egid suggested there may be FAA or union restrictions on participating in Q&A. That would be sad since pilots

  • So the other day as I was flying, I started to wonder: All pilots should be familiar with basic VFR cloud clearance requirements in 14 CFR 91.155 (and if not, then go study now!). When flying piston airplanes, we probably spend most of our time in the Class E below 10,000 ft. arena: This is great and all, but how can we actually determine how far away we are (especially vertically)? I thought about using a sextant and some "simple math": Unfortunately, I need to know my actual distance TO the cloud as well as my angle... A quick Google search found one of these, but I'm not so

  • Part 135 and (I believe) Part 121 operations all have a requirement to use a source of weather that has been approved by the U.S. National Weather Service: §135.213 Weather reports and forecasts. (a) Whenever a person operating an aircraft under this part is required to use a weather report or forecast, that person shall use that of the U.S. National Weather Service, a source... a list of weather providers that have been approved and are legal for us to use? If not, then how do we know whether a particular source has been approved?

Data information