Can I display the route which I have created with skyvector.com on google maps?

Falk
  • Can I display the route which I have created with skyvector.com on google maps? Falk

    I really appreciate skyvector.com as a tool for initial route planning and providing me with a good lookout to the upcoming VFR flight, but honestly I'm not very satisfied with the FAA Sectional charts.

    Using these charts navigation in some more congested areas is tough work especially as I'm not very familiar with the area yet. Its often useful to have a satellite picture of these areas to identify some helpfull landmarks, which might not be shown on the sectional.

    Does anyone know how to transfer the skyvector route to Google Maps, or know an alternative to achieve a similar result?

  • It's not web based, but you can use Google Earth for this -- There are overlays for aeronautical charts available, and you can do all your flight planning by entering routes in Google Earth. Then just turn off the sectional and you'll have the Google Earth satellite imagery to work with.

    As an added bonus (relating to your comment about mainly using an Android tabled): Google Earth is available as an Android application (and the plugin version of the chart overlay should work in the tablet app -- I know it works in the iOS version of Earth)


    BIG SCARY IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER

    As the folks who publish that collection of charts will tell you, the charts are not always current and thus should not be used for navigational purposes (much like SykVector).
    You can of course replace the chart graphics with current ones (or locate a chart collection that is current) if you want to, but as you're only using this as a pre-flight planning aid and will be doing your real flight planning with current charts and data the ones provided in the Google Earth Library are probably "good enough" for your purposes.

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