Do Grumman F-14s, Panavia Tornados, and other swing-wing airplanes count as "fixed-wing aircraft?"

ptgflyer
  • Do Grumman F-14s, Panavia Tornados, and other swing-wing airplanes count as "fixed-wing aircraft?" ptgflyer

    I'm just wondering because the wing isn't fixed, but they aren't rotary-wings either.

  • Yes - they are still considered fixed wing aircraft. Just because they have variable-sweep sections doesn't change what type of aircraft they are; their aerodynamics, behavior, and performance characteristics are still squarely in the 'fixed wing' category.

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