What are the weather requirements to log an instrument approach?

Lnafziger
  • What are the weather requirements to log an instrument approach? Lnafziger

    So let's assume that I'm the sole manipulator of the flight controls in an aircraft in which I'm rated and that I fly an instrument approach.

    What weather does the FAA require (assuming that I'm not wearing a view limiting device) in order to log the approach for currency requirements? For instance, if I am cleared for an ILS in visual conditions, can I log it? What if I start the approach in the clouds and break out at 1,500 ft and continue the approach? 1,000 ft? Before/after the outer marker? 150 feet above minimums? I think that you get the idea....

  • Rod Machado cites the FAA in an answer to this that I quite like, and which was pretty frequently referred to when I was instructing at a flight school:

    Once you have been cleared for and have initiated an instrument approach in IMC, you may log that approach for instrument currency, regardless of the altitude at which you break out of the clouds.

    This dates back to 1990, but I haven't seen any newer knowledge on this topic. Essentially, by flying any portion of an instrument approach procedure in actual instrument conditions, you're flying an approach that has required the use of instruments.

    If you don't enter IMC at any time during the approach, you cannot log it for currency. If you do, you can!

Related questions and answers
  • So let's assume that I'm the sole manipulator of the flight controls in an aircraft in which I'm rated and that I fly an instrument approach. What weather does the FAA require (assuming that I'm not wearing a view limiting device) in order to log the approach for currency requirements? For instance, if I am cleared for an ILS in visual conditions, can I log it? What if I start the approach in the clouds and break out at 1,500 ft and continue the approach? 1,000 ft? Before/after the outer marker? 150 feet above minimums? I think that you get the idea....

  • ground level. Although I don't see any obstructions that high during this segment of the approach, as far as I know instrument approaches are supposed to guarantee a 500 ft obstacle clearance, do...Non-precision instrument approaches generally have altitude restrictions which get lower when you get closer to the airport. I always figured these restrictions were AMSL using the current altimeter... actually are (or, as most pilots prefer to think, you're lower than what your altimeter reads) Have a look at this VOR approach into Newark Most altitude restrictions are a minimum level, so

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  • or VFR approach, or the appropriate missed approach procedure if we're on an instrument approach However, in the US, I often hear the pilot saying "going missed" when breaking off an instrument approach..., traffic pattern if visual, missed approach if on instruments), but doesn't say anything about the appropriate pilot phraseology. I couldn't find any reference in the AIM (chapter 4 section 2) either. (I also often hear just "missed approach", which I suppose would be appropriate when checking back in with approach, but not with the tower, although feel free to clarify that for me as well)

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